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Postgrowth Imaginaries: New Ecologies and Counterhegemonic Culture in Post-2008 Spain - Part 3, Chapter 4

Author:

Luis I. Prádanos

Miami University, US
About Luis I.
Luis I. Prádanos (Iñaki) is an Associate Professor of Hispanic Contemporary Studies at Miami University. His research focuses on ecocritical theory and environmental humanities in relation to Contemporary Iberian cultures. Specifically, Iñaki’s work combines environmental cultural studies, critical theory, and postgrowth economics. Iñaki has taught several courses on topics related to environmental humanities, urban ecology, postgrowth economics and cultures, and material ecocriticism. Some of his recent articles focus on the pedagogical implications of taking seriously the ongoing global socioecological crisis: “The Pedagogy of Degrowth.” In 2017, Iñaki edited a special section on “Contemporary Iberian Ecocriticism and New Materialisms” and co-edited a special number on “South Atlantic Ecocriticism.”
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Abstract

This chapter focuses on catastrophe fiction that explores the disturbing ecological consequences of sudden disruptions caused by extreme environmental events set in motion or exacerbated by growth-oriented activity. In this scenario, rapid anthropogenic changes in the earth’s ecological systems unleash a massive catastrophe at a regional or global level. This kind of fiction has commonly been assumed to have pedagogical implications because it highlights the destructive practices that humanity should abandon and promotes an activist lifestyle. By studying some of the most popular contemporary catastrophe audiovisual narratives in Spain (TV show El Barco and the movie The Impossible), I demonstrate that the pedagogical interpretation of catastrophe should be revisited for several reasons. Catastrophe-oriented fiction tends to ignore or, in the worse cases, conceal the pervasive structural violence against humans and nonhumans resulting from global neoliberal policies and growth economic dynamics. In order to encourage an effective political ecology, I argue that other kinds of narratives are much more effective and resistant to co-optation by the dominant imaginary: stories and projects that envision and perform desirable postgrowth imaginaries
How to Cite: Prádanos, L.I., 2018. Postgrowth Imaginaries: New Ecologies and Counterhegemonic Culture in Post-2008 Spain - Part 3, Chapter 4. Modern Languages Open, DOI: http://doi.org/10.3828/mlo.v0i0.249
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Published on 02 Nov 2018.
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